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Jo Johnson plans for KEF to measure knowledge exchange | Times …

The government wants to develop a “knowledge excellence framework” for English universities, the universities and science minister has announced.

Jo Johnson outlined the plan, which he says will be consulted on with the sector, in a speech today at the annual conference of the Higher Education Funding Council for England.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy said in a statement on the plans that the UK “still lags behind comparable countries like the United States in terms of intellectual property income per research resource and the number of successful spin-off companies”.

The KEF, if created, would go alongside the existing teaching excellence framework and the research excellence framework as attempts to measure the quality of what universities do.

It is not yet clear how often the assessment will take place, but the minister said there was a “strong case” for setting strict measurements for university progress, and confirmed universities could endanger their funding if they did not meet the expectations of the new framework.

“We do anticipate that allocations for Higher Education Innovations Funding (HEIF) will be informed by the outcomes of the knowledge exchange framework,” he told Times Higher Education.

In addition, HEIF is to be allocated a further £40 million from the government, Mr Johnson said, bringing the total to £200 million for the 2018-19 academic year.

Addressing university leaders, Mr Johnson said universities must do more to strengthen links with businesses and local communities.

“Universities have a vital role to play in their local communities and in the national economy. Given the record levels of public investment in RD, it is essential that universities engage with businesses and communities to make the most of their knowledge and research.

“There are great examples of this across the country, but the system needs to find a new gear. University income from business engagement is growing more slowly than the economy as a whole, with British universities producing fewer spin-outs and less licensing income per pound of research resource than US counterparts. As a greater proportion of RD takes place in universities in the UK than in other countries, it’s especially important that we get this right.”

The minister announced plans to ask the new Research England to consult the sector on the development of a KEF to benchmark performance in university-business collaboration and knowledge exchange.

“Alongside the research excellence framework and the teaching excellence framework, the KEF will act as a benchmark for universities to ensure they are making the most of the opportunities available and help ensure that the UK benefits from the research, skills and knowledge in the higher education sector,” BEIS said.


In full: Jo Johnson’s speech to Hefce 2017


Mr Johnson also called on the industry to expand on international collaboration in science and innovations, referencing a recent agreement signed with the US. “Internationally co-authored articles achieve higher citation levels and it is important this is not compromised,” he said.

In a bid to attract talent to the UK post-Brexit, the minister announced an additional £18 million for the Rutherford Fund, enabling an extra 200 fellowships to begin in the current financial year.

The first round of projects to receive funding from the £100 million Connecting Capability Fund were also announced. Focussing on university collaborations to boost the commercialisation of research, the first round will see groups of universities from England share £20 million to address areas such as age-related diseases, access to finance for spinouts, and support for SMEs as they scale-up.

rachael.pells@timeshighereducation.com

Article source: https://www.timeshighereducation.com/jo-johnson-plans-kef-measure-knowledge-exchange

Bill introduced would restructure higher education system – The …

The Daily Illini File Photo

The Daily Illini File Photo

A retooling of the higher education system in Illinois is in the works.

Illinois’ Chapin Rose (R-Mahomet) and State Rep. Daniel Brady (R-Bloomington) recently introduced their Higher Education Strategic Centers of Excellence Plan, which aims to keep Illinois high-school graduates in Illinois universities by making the application system easier.

Creating a streamlined, uniform online admission process for all public Illinois universities is one of the plan’s goals.

“What we’re looking for is trying to be more efficient in our applications to our schools to make it more universal,” Brady said. “Instead of each school making its students require an application, application process fees, transcript fees. For (high school students) to stay in Illinois, we have to make it easier for them to do so.”

Bercham Kamber
Source: IBHE

In addition, any new programs created at all Illinois universities will be put through “economic efficiency review.” With this, the Illinois Board of Higher Education will analyze any new programs at all public colleges in order to decide which programs get financial support, and where other funds could be cut.

On Sen. Brady’s website, he specifically calls out the University of Illinois at Springfield for adding a new $82.6 million STEM building to its campus. Though the proposal by  the UIS campus officials states that their building is looking for $65 million, Brady mentions on his website that other Illinois colleges such as Northern and Western Illinois have their own STEM programs that need funding.

“The decline of public education funding, higher education, has been seen over the last few years,” Brady said. “What funding they are getting, they’re appropriating directly to different things other than maybe the use of technology to help streamline their application process.”

The Executive Director for the Office of University Relations Tom Hardy says that the University of Illinois has had a 5.2 percent decline in state funding from 2005 to 2015. This has resulted in an increase in tuition rates, with revenues from tuition and fees has gone up 155.5 percent, about $668 million.

“Initially, rates were increased to help offset some of the reductions in state appropriations … but we have held tuition flat for incoming resident students now for three consecutive years,” Hardy said.

The Brady-Rose plan also aims to guarantee all Illinois high school students with at least a B average admission to one of the Illinois public schools, provided that they can keep up their academic performance through college graduation.

“By saying that more students could attend public universities, if they don’t get their first choice or they’re still a B student, that means they can be directed to other schools,” Brady told The Daily Illini. “Which still means the overall system in the higher education of Illinois could still be the winner by that student staying in Illinois.

According to the latest data by the National Center for Education Statistics, Illinois trails only New Jersey for losing high-school students to out-of-state colleges. At their legislation announcement, Rose and Brady said that from 1991 to 2014, enrollment at Illinois universities has decreased by 50,000 students.

“It affects the state of Illinois by some of our best and brightest going elsewhere for higher education, so it affects it. It affects potential revenue to those schools for tuition dollars. If they move out of Illinois, statistics show that they generally don’t return,” Sen. Brady said.

Hardy said that more than 80 percent of undergraduates in the University of Illinois system (Chicago, Champaign-Urbana and Springfield) are from Illinois. The total University of Illinois system enrollment for those from Illinois is 83,000, a record number according to Hardy.

The University of Illinois system has tried to sustain this number, with their introduction of Invest In Illinoisans, a financial aid initiative to get more assistance to in-state students to curb the number of high school graduates going out of state. Hardy also said that Tim Killeen, president of the University of Illinois system, teamed up with presidents from Southern and Eastern Illinois University for a fair with southern Illinois high school students to talk about staying in state.

Sen. Brady, a representative of Bloomington-Normal, said one of the main public colleges in his district is Illinois State University. He said that he has had discussions with administrators, deans and professors there, and while they may have hesitations, he said across the board that something has to be done about the higher education system.

“I think if parts of this, any or all parts of this would become law, I see it affecting hopefully in a positive manner, all of our nine Universities and the twelve campuses,”  Brady said.”If we can keep students in Illinois, no matter what institute of higher education they’re going to, it’s better for schools all around.” 

[email protected]

Article source: https://dailyillini.com/news/2017/10/12/bill-introduced-restructure-higher-education-system/

Nevada higher education system reform tackles administrative bloat

A reform plan that would give the state legislature more authority and control over the Nevada System of Education is on a trajectory to reach the ballot box by 2020, but the proposal has yet to win a ringing endorsement from educators.

The issue has gained traction at the same time members of the Board of Regents have questioned whether the higher education system is top-heavy and has been looking to hire too many vice chancellors.

The legislature passed Assembly Joint Resolution 5 earlier this year in the wake of concerns raised in a Las Vegas Review-Journal article last year. The higher education system had misled a legislative committee that was looking at revising the state’s higher education funding formula, according to the newspaper report.

“The Board of Regents has, at various times, taken actions that have hindered, thwarted or undermined the Legislature’s investigation, review and scrutiny of the institutions, programs and operations of the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE),” the bill states.

The higher education reform plan must be approved by the legislature through a second vote in 2019. If approved next year, it will go before the state’s voters as a proposed constitutional amendment in 2020.

Some observers see the legislature’s effort to alter the higher education system’s constitutional status as separate from the question of whether the Chancellor’s Office is top-heavy, with too much administrative overhead.

“We see AJR 5 as not directly related to the question of administrative bloat,” David Steel, executive director of the Nevada Faculty Alliance, told Watchdog.org. “However, we do believe that the passage of AJR 5 has to do with questions about the management of NSHE.”

A PowerPoint description of the objectives of the Nevada higher education reforms favored by Sen. Joyce Woodhouse (D-Henderson) and Assemblyman Elliot Anderson (D-Las Vegas) said the plan would allow regents and the legislature to review both policies and funding priorities at individual campuses.

Members of the Board of Regents would remain elected officials under AJR 5.

The Nevada Faculty Alliance does see administrative bloat as a nationwide trend in academic institutions and urges Nevadans to remain vigilant against it.

“Faculty are the front-line workers doing the teaching and research that completes NSHE’s mission,” Steel said, “and no amount of high-level administrators can substitute for an adequately numerous and well-supported faculty.”

Stefani Relles, an assistant professor at the University of Nevada’s College of Education, didn’t comment directly on whether the system’s administrative budget is excessive. But Nevada’s overall higher education budget, as a share of the gross state product, is among the smallest compared to other states, according to Relles.

“Rather than assuming the administrative budget is too high, it would seem equally appropriate to consider if the overall budget is actually too low,” she told Watchdog.org in an email.

Relles polled her doctoral students, who are administrators and leaders in other state institutions, about this issue prior to emailing her responses.

“Because the system’s overall well-being is intertwined with the state’s long-term economic health, the legislature needs to consider the possible consequences of narrow solutions,” she said.

By design, the Chancellor’s Office serves the public good when it allows autonomy at individual campuses, according to Relles. That’s because ensuring academic freedom requires shared governance with faculty members at the campuses, she said.

But that’s not to say the Chancellor’s Office should operate with total independence, according to Relles.

“Based on evidence of past corruption in the Chancellor’s Office, it is reasonable to audit if and how NSHE’s budgeting practices serve the taxpayers and students,” she said.

Relles also sees problems with AJR 5 because traditional methods of improving fiscal accountability don’t fit well with the broad mission of colleges and universities.

“While it would seem logical that greater oversight and management by a central authority can help reduce fiscal mismanagement, higher education is not a purely financial investment,” Relles said. “Decentralization preserves academic freedom and the productivity of research to inform state policies and practices.”

A tighter rein on higher education could thus be short-sighted because so many other key outcomes could be affected, she said.

Others have questioned whether Nevada’s institutions of higher learning are, in fact, giving taxpayers enough bang for their buck in terms of graduation rates. The number of students earning four-year degrees at Nevada’s public colleges and universities remains well below that of many other western states, according to the Guinn Center for Policy Priorities in Nevada.

Article source: https://www.watchdog.org/nevada/nevada-higher-education-system-reform-tackles-administrative-bloat/article_ff429738-ad25-11e7-bf6b-0f067d086d01.html

English university funding ‘up in the air’ as review looms

A major new review of university funding could potentially bring the return of the student numbers cap and a cut in funding per student, according to policy analysts.

Although the terms of the review, announced by the prime minister during her speech at the Tory party conference last week, have yet to be announced, some sector observers believe it could put all options back on the table in terms of how universities are funded. But others suggest that the exercise could have specific objectives, such as “price differentiation”, in mind.

The impetus behind the review appears to be primarily political, with the Conservative leadership rattled by the electoral impact Jeremy Corbyn scored with his pledge to scrap tuition fees and reintroduce maintenance grants.

Nick Hillman, director of the Higher Education Policy Institute, said that if it was a “genuine review” then there would be opportunities and risks for universities. “The point about a review is that absolutely everything gets thrown up in the air again,” he added. 

“This could lead to some improvements for part-time students, [whose numbers] have had a massive decline, or there could be some extra focus on the quality of the student experience, or it could lead to the reimposition of student number controls and less money for funding each student,” he continued.

Mr Hillman, a former adviser to Lord Willetts in his time as universities minister, added that he has yet to meet any senior politicians who say they want to see the numbers cap return.

Given some of the media coverage of universities in recent months, Mr Hillman said there was a risk that institutions could end up with less funding per student.

He added that those who have been “mouthing off over the summer…have forgotten about what the £9,000 [fee] is. It is a good sum of money to educate students to a world-class standard. You can’t reduce it and think there will be no impact at all on the quality of education.”

Mr Hillman said any cut in the headline student fee would leave a funding shortfall that he was “sceptical” the government would cover beyond the short term.

Andy Westwood, professor of government practice at the University of Manchester, said the politics of student finance had made a review “inevitable”. But it seemed No 10 had “some very clear objectives” from it, which included “price differentiation, price objective, price competition and a big theme on value for money and cross subsidy”.

There was also a risk that Theresa May’s waning popularity could render it subject to “political forces”, he added. “That could mean that the policy asks of the review change as its task masters change,” he said.

Following reports that universities’ fee caps could be linked to their graduate earnings, Professor Westwood said this was a “utilitarian” approach to funding that was at odds with the priorities of the industrial strategy, which ministers hope can address regional differences in productivity and growth.

Gavan Conlon, a partner at London Economics, who has worked on several sector finance reports, said that it was important the review had the correct remit. “If they get the criteria wrong then we will just end up being in the same situation in five to 10 years’ time,” he said.

“It has to be far-reaching and looking at all aspects of higher education fees and numbers…There has to be a consideration on who pays, whether it is the students or the Exchequer but also whether it should be employers,” he added.

holly.else@timeshighereducation.com

Article source: https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/english-university-funding-air-review-looms

Jo Johnson plans for KEF to measure knowledge exchange

The government wants to develop a “knowledge excellence framework” for English universities, the universities and science minister has announced.

Jo Johnson outlined the plan, which he says will be consulted on with the sector, in a speech today at the annual conference of the Higher Education Funding Council for England.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy said in a statement on the plans that the UK “still lags behind comparable countries like the United States in terms of intellectual property income per research resource and the number of successful spin-off companies”.

The KEF, if created, would go alongside the existing teaching excellence framework and the research excellence framework as attempts to measure the quality of what universities do.

It is not yet clear how often the assessment will take place, but the minister said there was a “strong case” for setting strict measurements for university progress, and confirmed universities could endanger their funding if they did not meet the expectations of the new framework.

“We do anticipate that allocations for Higher Education Innovations Funding (HEIF) will be informed by the outcomes of the knowledge exchange framework,” he told Times Higher Education.

In addition, HEIF is to be allocated a further £40 million from the government, Mr Johnson said, bringing the total to £200 million for the 2018-19 academic year.

Addressing university leaders, Mr Johnson said universities must do more to strengthen links with businesses and local communities.

“Universities have a vital role to play in their local communities and in the national economy. Given the record levels of public investment in RD, it is essential that universities engage with businesses and communities to make the most of their knowledge and research.

“There are great examples of this across the country, but the system needs to find a new gear. University income from business engagement is growing more slowly than the economy as a whole, with British universities producing fewer spin-outs and less licensing income per pound of research resource than US counterparts. As a greater proportion of RD takes place in universities in the UK than in other countries, it’s especially important that we get this right.”

The minister announced plans to ask the new Research England to consult the sector on the development of a KEF to benchmark performance in university-business collaboration and knowledge exchange.

“Alongside the research excellence framework and the teaching excellence framework, the KEF will act as a benchmark for universities to ensure they are making the most of the opportunities available and help ensure that the UK benefits from the research, skills and knowledge in the higher education sector,” BEIS said.


In full: Jo Johnson’s speech to Hefce 2017


Mr Johnson also called on the industry to expand on international collaboration in science and innovations, referencing a recent agreement signed with the US. “Internationally co-authored articles achieve higher citation levels and it is important this is not compromised,” he said.

In a bid to attract talent to the UK post-Brexit, the minister announced an additional £18 million for the Rutherford Fund, enabling an extra 200 fellowships to begin in the current financial year.

The first round of projects to receive funding from the £100 million Connecting Capability Fund were also announced. Focussing on university collaborations to boost the commercialisation of research, the first round will see groups of universities from England share £20 million to address areas such as age-related diseases, access to finance for spinouts, and support for SMEs as they scale-up.

john.morgan@timeshighereducation.com

Article source: https://www.timeshighereducation.com/jo-johnson-plans-kef-measure-knowledge-exchange

Bill introduced would restructure higher education system

The Daily Illini File Photo

The Daily Illini File Photo

A retooling of the higher education system in Illinois is in the works.

Illinois’ Chapin Rose (R-Mahomet) and State Rep. Daniel Brady (R-Bloomington) recently introduced their Higher Education Strategic Centers of Excellence Plan, which aims to keep Illinois high-school graduates in Illinois universities by making the application system easier.

Creating a streamlined, uniform online admission process for all public Illinois universities is one of the plan’s goals.

“What we’re looking for is trying to be more efficient in our applications to our schools to make it more universal,” Brady said. “Instead of each school making its students require an application, application process fees, transcript fees. For (high school students) to stay in Illinois, we have to make it easier for them to do so.”

Bercham Kamber
Source: IBHE

In addition, any new programs created at all Illinois universities will be put through “economic efficiency review.” With this, the Illinois Board of Higher Education will analyze any new programs at all public colleges in order to decide which programs get financial support, and where other funds could be cut.

On Sen. Brady’s website, he specifically calls out the University of Illinois at Springfield for adding a new $82.6 million STEM building to its campus. Though the proposal by  the UIS campus officials states that their building is looking for $65 million, Brady mentions on his website that other Illinois colleges such as Northern and Western Illinois have their own STEM programs that need funding.

“The decline of public education funding, higher education, has been seen over the last few years,” Brady said. “What funding they are getting, they’re appropriating directly to different things other than maybe the use of technology to help streamline their application process.”

The Executive Director for the Office of University Relations Tom Hardy says that the University of Illinois has had a 5.2 percent decline in state funding from 2005 to 2015. This has resulted in an increase in tuition rates, with revenues from tuition and fees has gone up 155.5 percent, about $668 million.

“Initially, rates were increased to help offset some of the reductions in state appropriations … but we have held tuition flat for incoming resident students now for three consecutive years,” Hardy said.

The Brady-Rose plan also aims to guarantee all Illinois high school students with at least a B average admission to one of the Illinois public schools, provided that they can keep up their academic performance through college graduation.

“By saying that more students could attend public universities, if they don’t get their first choice or they’re still a B student, that means they can be directed to other schools,” Brady told The Daily Illini. “Which still means the overall system in the higher education of Illinois could still be the winner by that student staying in Illinois.

According to the latest data by the National Center for Education Statistics, Illinois trails only New Jersey for losing high-school students to out-of-state colleges. At their legislation announcement, Rose and Brady said that from 1991 to 2014, enrollment at Illinois universities has decreased by 50,000 students.

“It affects the state of Illinois by some of our best and brightest going elsewhere for higher education, so it affects it. It affects potential revenue to those schools for tuition dollars. If they move out of Illinois, statistics show that they generally don’t return,” Sen. Brady said.

Hardy said that more than 80 percent of undergraduates in the University of Illinois system (Chicago, Champaign-Urbana and Springfield) are from Illinois. The total University of Illinois system enrollment for those from Illinois is 83,000, a record number according to Hardy.

The University of Illinois system has tried to sustain this number, with their introduction of Invest In Illinoisans, a financial aid initiative to get more assistance to in-state students to curb the number of high school graduates going out of state. Hardy also said that Tim Killeen, president of the University of Illinois system, teamed up with presidents from Southern and Eastern Illinois University for a fair with southern Illinois high school students to talk about staying in state.

Sen. Brady, a representative of Bloomington-Normal, said one of the main public colleges in his district is Illinois State University. He said that he has had discussions with administrators, deans and professors there, and while they may have hesitations, he said across the board that something has to be done about the higher education system.

“I think if parts of this, any or all parts of this would become law, I see it affecting hopefully in a positive manner, all of our nine Universities and the twelve campuses,”  Brady said.”If we can keep students in Illinois, no matter what institute of higher education they’re going to, it’s better for schools all around.” 

[email protected]

Article source: https://dailyillini.com/news/2017/10/12/bill-introduced-restructure-higher-education-system/

British MP Peter Hain on the funding of higher education in SA

Hain believes the only solution to funding tertiary education in both countries is a progressive tax for graduates‚ based on their salaries.

“I just think the extra rates we are talking about‚ 1 or 2%‚ is so marginal. I just do not believe people will notice it … You pay more tax anyway‚ because you are earning more.”

One of the audience members said South Africa was different to England because of so-called “black tax”. This entailed employed black people financially supporting their parents‚ siblings or other family members.

Hain said‚ according to research‚ South African graduates earned about R260‚000 more annually than non-graduates and about R6-million over the course of their careers.

He said there are about 400‚000 more students at South African universities now than there were in 1994.

“[Tertiary education is] taking resources away from other pressing social and economic priorities‚ especially given the depth of the poverty and homelessness that there is in South Africa.”

Hain does not believe technology is the answer to opening access to education‚ because wealthier students have more knowledge about and access to technology.

Former finance minister and interim director of the Wits Business School Nhlanhla Nene introduced Hain.

Nene said he did not expect the Heher Commission’s report on free higher education to provide any solutions‚ but believes the “sooner it is presented‚ the sooner we can debate” and agree on a solution.

Article source: https://www.timeslive.co.za/news/south-africa/2017-10-11-british-mp-peter-hain-on-the-funding-of-higher-education-in-sa/

University of Montreal seeks French students rejected at home

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Article source: https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/university-montreal-seeks-french-students-rejected-home

Georgia’s Higher Education Landscape: Demographics, Funding and What Students Pay

Thanks for your interest in GBPI’s upcoming webinar, “Georgia’s Higher Education Landscape: Demographics, Funding and What Students Pay.” This webinar is for anyone interested in learning more about higher education in Georgia. Who do Georgia’s public university and technical college systems serve? How is public higher education funded in Georgia, and how have prices changes for students and families? The discussion will cover trends in student demographics, funding and college costs. The webinar will explore both the challenges and opportunities Georgia faces as it works to increase the number of people with postsecondary degrees and credentials.

Please complete the form below to register. You will receive a confirmation email with the webinar link and other details. You will also be subscribed to GBPI’s “Higher Ed Bulletin,” a monthly e-newsletter covering research, news, success stories and other resources for people passionate about Georgia’s higher education system.

What: Georgia’s Higher Education Landscape Webinar: Demographics, Funding and What Students Pay

When: Wed., 10/25 from 12 noon to 1 pm

Where: After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with the webinar link.

Recommended Reading




Article source: https://gbpi.org/2017/higher-ed-webinar/

Higher education reforms – including Bright Futures – remain top Senate priority

Kristen M. Clark

Kristen covers the Florida Legislature and state government in the Tampa Bay Times/Miami Herald Tallahassee bureau.

Article source: http://www.tampabay.com/florida-politics/buzz/2017/10/10/higher-education-reforms-including-bright-futures-remain-top-senate-priority/