Rss Feed
Tweeter button
Facebook button

Adult Antiepileptics for PGTC Seizures Effective in Children

In order to use Medscape, your browser must be set to accept cookies delivered by the Medscape site.

Medscape uses cookies to customize the site based on the information we collect at registration. The cookies contain no personally identifiable information and have no effect once you leave the Medscape site.

Article source: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/879015

Missouri bill would raise adult crimes age

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — An advocacy group is pushing a bill that would increase the age of people tried in court as adults to 18 years.

KOLR-TV (http://bit.ly/2oIfN81 ) reports that Missouri is one of seven states that treat 17-year-olds as adults in the criminal-justice system. A group called the “Raise the Age Coalition” has been pushing for a change.

Vivian Murphy is the former director of the Missouri Juvenile Justice Association. She says science has proved teenagers’ brains still are developing, and that that putting them in with adult inmates makes them more likely to re-offend.

Critics say the bill doesn’t include additional state funding to hire more juvenile officers.

The House bill could be heard before the end of the legislative session. A similar bill in the Senate has been stuck in committee.

___

Information from: KOLR-TV, http://www.kolr10.com

Article source: http://www.dailyprogress.com/missouri-bill-would-raise-adult-crimes-age/article_2de7ded2-b35b-5a86-bd1c-1e6be052586f.html

Which Animated Movie Do You Appreciate Even More As An Adult?

View this image ›

Article source: https://www.buzzfeed.com/pedrofequiere/which-animated-movie-do-you-appreciate-even-more-as-an-adult

Politics Zeroes Out New Mexico’s Higher Education Budget

SANTA FE, N.M. (CN) — In a continuing political struggle, the bipartisan New Mexico Legislative Council has sued Gov. Susana Martinez, claiming the Republican governor’s line-item vetoes of the entire budget for the Legislature and higher education is unconstitutional.

The request for original writ of mandamus in the New Mexico Supreme Court claims Martinez is seeking “to eviscerate the ability of the other branch [of government] to perform its essential functions.”

Martinez’s defunding of all higher education in New Mexico is payback for the state Senate’s refusal to approve her candidates for regents of the University of New Mexico, the Legislative Council says in the April 21 filing.

Martinez said in an executive message when signed the state’s appropriation bill that the Legislature “refused to bear their fair share of the burden” of budget cuts, increasing its own budget while refusing to appropriate it specifically and by category.

As for vetoing the funding for the state’s universities, Martinez said, “the funding for our higher education institutions and the confirmation of well-qualified regents can be addressed in the upcoming special session.”

Martinez’s spokesman Michael Lonergan called the lawsuit “an attempt to bully” the governor.  “They’re suing the governor because they want to raise taxes, and she’s the only one standing in their way,” Lonergan said.

But in an affidavit accompanying the lawsuit, David Abbey, director of the New Mexico Legislative Finance Committee, said the Legislature’s budget for higher education was only about $51,000 more than Martinez recommended, an increase of less than 0.007 percent.

And a letter from the New Mexico Council of University Presidents states that the cuts to higher education constitute 44 percent of the cuts in the entire budget, while higher education accounts for only 12.8 percent of state spending.

The Legislative Council says the vetoes were an unconstitutional attempt to disable the Legislature and eliminate one branch of government entirely.

“Governor Martinez’s attempt to eliminate the funding for, and the ability of, a co-equal branch of government to perform their essential functions constitutes a violation of separation of powers,” the complaint states.

It asks the supreme court to invalidate the vetoes and to restore funding to the Legislature and state universities.

The Legislative Council is represented by Thomas Hnasko with Hinkle Shanor in Santa Fe.

Martinez’s spokesman Lonergan called the lawsuit “disappointing, because it shows a refusal to compromise, as this is nothing but an attempt to bully her by short-circuiting the legislative process before a special session.”

No date has been set for the expected special session.

Martinez has until May 5 to file a response, and the New Mexico Council of University Presidents is invited to file an amicus curiae brief.

The state supreme court will hear oral arguments on May 15.

Article source: https://www.courthousenews.com/politics-zeroes-new-mexicos-higher-education-budget/

NI budget may impose 2.5% education cut

Children in classroomImage copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Northern Ireland’s education system would face a further cut of 2.5% if an emergency budget is introduced

Northern Ireland’s secretary of state has published indicative figures for a budget he will impose if the Stormont parties do not reach a deal.

The indicative figures include a 3% increase in cash for health spending but a 2.5% cut for education.

Secretary of State James Brokenshire said he took advice from senior civil servants and is attempting to reflect the priorities of the local parties.

His intention is to “give clarity” in the absence of an executive.

  • How will election impact NI finances?

Stormont’s finances have been under the control of a senior civil servant since the start of the financial year because the previous executive did not produce a budget.

Mr Brokenshire said the totals he has set out “would not constrain the future ability of an incoming executive to adjust its priorities during the course of the year”.

Image caption

James Brokenshire said his intention was to give clarity to Stormont departments in the absence of an executive

Aside from health, the only other Stormont department to see a significant increase in day-to-day spending is the Department of Communities.

Its spending is up by 9%, which is understood to reflect welfare reform mitigation measures agreed by the previous executive.

The capital part of the budget would make available funding for projects which were announced by the executive as part of their 2016-17 Budget.

These include the A5 and A6 road projects, the Belfast Transport Hub, and the Mother and Children’s Hospital.

Northern Ireland has been without a devolved government since January, when the coalition collapsed over a botched energy scheme.

The late Martin McGuinness, of Sinn Féin, quit as deputy first minister in protest at the Democratic Unionist Party’s handling of the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) scandal.

It led to a snap election to the Northern Ireland Assembly on 2 March, which saw a surge in Sinn Féin’s vote.

Stormont’s two largest parties have been unable to reach agreement to share power since that date, and were warned they face either a second assembly election or direct rule from Westminster.

However, Prime Minister Theresa May’s decision to call a snap election to the House of Commons made a deal even more unlikely as parties switched to campaign mode.

In order to keep day-to-day services running in the absence of locally elected ministers, the Westminster government published emergency legislation last week – known as the Ministerial Appointments and Regional Rates Bill

The bill began its accelerated passage through Westminster on Monday.

Article source: http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-39698766

Teachers criticise planned NI education cuts

Children in classroomImage copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

The planned cuts showed the political parties and the secretary of state were holding children and their future to ransom, said one principal

Teachers have criticised a plan to cut funding for education if the Stormont parties do not reach an agreement on forming a new power-sharing executive.

Secretary of State James Brokenshire published indicative figures for a budget he would impose if the parties do not reach a deal.

The proposed 2.5% cut would represent a loss of £50m from the education budget.

One principal described the cut as “completely savage” and others warned that teachers would lose their jobs.

  • NI budget may impose 2.5% education cut
  • How will election impact NI finances?

“This is really all the political parties, plus the secretary of state, holding our children and their future to ransom, so that a political deal can be struck to restore the executive,” said Kevin Donaghy, principal of St Ronan’s Primary School in Newry, County Down.

Secretary of State James Brokenshire said he had taken advice from senior civil servants and was attempting to reflect the priorities of the local parties.

His intention was to “give clarity” in the absence of an executive, he said.


Analysis – BBC News NI education correspondent Robbie Meredith

Most of Stormont’s £1.9bn education budget is spent on paying school staff and on services like school transport, maintenance and special educational needs.

Therefore principals, boards of governors – and the Education Authority – have limited wriggle room when it comes to saving money.

Many schools were already feeling the squeeze, and there is no guarantee that the restoration of the executive would provide more cash.

But with no local agreement imminent, schools are set to face additional cuts this year.

And one principal I spoke to accused the political parties of “fiddling while Rome burns”.


However, two principals have said the cuts would mean teachers being put of work.

Deirdre Gillespie, principal of St Mary’s Grammar School in Magherafelt, County Londonderry, said: “The only way that I can stand still, not balance my books but stand still, would be to make three teachers redundant and I simply can’t afford to run a school with three less teachers.

“It will mean that I will have to reduce my curriculum even further, my class sizes would have to increase and that’s impossible because I can’t fit any more children into the classroom.”

Image caption

James Brokenshire said his intention was to give clarity to Stormont departments in the absence of an executive

Marie Lindsay, principal of St Mary’s College in Londonderry, also said the cut would mean “two and a half or three teachers” losing their jobs.

“I’m angry,” she said. “I read that one of the decisions was to reflect political priorities.

“This means our young people are not worth investing in.”

Ralph Magee, from Andrews Memorial Primary School in Comber, County Down, said schools were on an “unknown playing field”.

“We need a collective voice here from all school leaders and, I would argue, the education authority as well in saying that schools cannot provide what you’re expecting to provide at the moment if you plan for these cuts to come in over the next few years.”

Stormont’s finances have been under the control of a senior civil servant since the start of the financial year because the previous executive did not produce a budget.

Mr Brokenshire said the totals he has set out “would not constrain the future ability of an incoming executive to adjust its priorities during the course of the year”.

His indicative budget includes £42m which has not yet been allocated to departments: If all that money was allocated to education it would eliminate most of the shortfall in the department’s budget.

Deal unlikely

Northern Ireland has been without a devolved government since January, when the coalition collapsed over a botched energy scheme.

The late Martin McGuinness, of Sinn Féin, quit as deputy first minister in protest at the Democratic Unionist Party’s handling of the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) scandal.

It led to a snap election to the Northern Ireland Assembly on 2 March, which saw a surge in Sinn Féin’s vote.

Stormont’s two largest parties have been unable to reach agreement to share power since that date, and were warned they face either a second assembly election or direct rule from Westminster.

However, Prime Minister Theresa May’s decision to call a snap election to the House of Commons made a deal even more unlikely as parties switched to campaign mode.

In order to keep day-to-day services running in the absence of locally elected ministers, the Westminster government published emergency legislation last week – known as the Ministerial Appointments and Regional Rates Bill

The bill passed its accelerated passage through Westminster on Monday and is set to become law by the end of the week.

Article source: http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-39701954

Meet the Colorado education researcher you can actually understand

Have you ever wandered into a thicket of education research terminology and wished you had a translator? Someone who could put “effect size” and “causal inference” into perspective? Or just English?

Kevin Welner’s your man.

On Monday, the Boulder professor was recognized with the 2017 American Educational Research Association’s Outstanding Public Communication of Education Research Award.

Welner, who has been featured in the Washington Post and on NPR, shared a few tips with Chalkbeat.

Education research can be complicated and mind-numbing. What’s your secret to communicating so the general public can understand it?

My personal “secret” is just a lot of editing and rewriting, sharing drafts with friends and colleagues and seeking to squeeze out the academese.

But more important is the secret underlying the National Education Policy Center, which I direct and which is housed at the University of Colorado Boulder’s School of Education: We have a ready pool of hundreds of top researchers from around the country.

So if we need someone who can make sense of a research study with methods that are mind-numbingly complicated, we can quickly reach out to any of a dozen brilliant minds, all trained to fully understand those methods. If we need an expert who knows all the research on early-childhood education, class-size reduction or charter schools, we can do the same. We then work with those experts to engage in the editing process I noted above for myself – all geared toward ensuring that the published version is useful for academics as well as the general public.

What advice would you give to other academics and policy wonks ?

In the graduate programs where we receive our Ph.D. training, we learn almost nothing (or literally nothing) about how to communicate our research to a broader audience. Instead, our training focuses on preparing researchers to add to the scholarly knowledge base. We do that through academic journals, books, conferences, etc.

We designed the National Education Policy Center to help close that gap — to facilitate communications between the scholarly conversation and the conversation that everyone else is having, often about the same issues.

My advice to researchers would be to embrace opportunities to speak to a larger audience, even if it means stepping out of our comfort zones. The truth is that we’ve already found an enormous readiness to do so. Notwithstanding our training, and even the incentive systems that reward university-based researchers for more traditional work, we have seen a strong interest in this work, generally known as “public scholarship.”

You’ve critiqued influential news organizations, including U.S. News and World Report about their rankings of the nation’s best high schools. Why is it important to raise public questions about such things?

At best, each of us can only have real expertise in a very small number of areas. When a medical doctor or auto mechanic tells me something based on their expertise, I’m largely at their mercy. I often don’t know enough to even ask the right questions, let alone to have a B.S. detector for their answers.

What I and my colleagues at the National Education Policy Center have tried to do in the area of education research is to show the broader public a fuller picture. The U.S. News work I did, regarding high school rankings, is a good example. The rankings were undermined by technical problems, sloppiness, and fundamental problems involving choices about how and what to include in their measurement formulas. How would a parent who sees those rankings otherwise know about these weaknesses?

Article source: http://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/co/2017/04/24/meet-the-colorado-education-researcher-you-can-actually-understand/

TILT Pinball Bar: All the ridiculous childhood fun in an adult package

Game bars have been opening up across the Twin Cities, from an artist-designed mini golf course with adult cereal milkshakes to a full service scratch kitchen with a vintage arcade.

An increasing number have put the games front and center. But very few of them have done it the way TILT does.

TILT is pinball first, a bar second, and if you do not care to play, it’s probably best to look elsewhere.

But here’s the thing: You do want to play! You really do.

This arcade for adults (kids are welcome too, if accompanied by an adult before 9 p.m.) opens up into an ultra-cacophony the moment you step inside. Your eyes must adjust to the dim nightclub level lighting, with most of the illumination emanating from the machines. You already know what a pinball machine sounds like. But do you know what 22 of them sound like in all their simultaneous glory? Awesome, that’s what. It sounds awesome.

While it’s possible to use this place as a typical bar — with the affordable prices on beer, wine, and cocktails ($6 to $8), plus snacks and dogs in the $5 to $8 range — you’d be missing the point. It’s only when you acquiesce to the power of the game that the true value of TILT becomes clear.

 

Mecca Bos 

There’s a zen satisfaction to sliding a shiny quarter into a little slot and sending that silver ball sailing up its habit trail. For five minutes (or longer if you don’t completely suck) you’re the master of your own 29-by-55-inch universe.

The owners of Nightingale, Jasha Johnston and Carrie Mccabe Johnston, are in charge of the food and the drinks. Their third partner, John Galvin, is the pinball curator. His role is important to the aesthetic of the place. He’s also the owner of DG Pinball, a family business he grew up in, where he deals, maintains, and essentially lives and breathes pinball.

Galvin has hand-selected 22 machines, which will rotate periodically. Does the Adams Family by Bally mean anything to you? They got that. What about a Gottlieb Dancing Dolls produced in 1960, with only 1,150 produced in total? They have that too.

They also have all beef hot dogs from family farm Peterson Craft Meats, vegan dogs from the Herbivorous Butcher, family recipe potato salad that’s as good as a church potluck’s, and a bunch of chips and dips.

There’s a handful of well-selected beers on tap, including Sisyphus Double Danger Pale Ale brewed only for Tilt, plus many more beers in cans, actually drinkable wine priced affordably, and cocktails.

Also: shots. Because you need two hands to play pinball. All the games thoughtfully have drinks stands.

On Sunday mornings they plan to host a kid’s league.

This is the most sure-thing family outing in town, where everyone can be happy, with the games taking the pressure out of too much conversation with mom, or forcing kids to sit still. Plus a hot dog menu that takes the pressure out of dinner.

And drinking.

Now open.
113 East 26th St., Minneapolis
612-236-4089
tiltpinballbar.com 

Article source: http://www.citypages.com/restaurants/tilt-pinball-bar-all-the-ridiculous-childhood-fun-in-an-adult-package/420080024

Jazz mascot teaches important lesson about sportsmanship, levels mean adult – Caution: Slightly NSFW language in …

By: | April 24, 2017 10:40 am

Article source: http://ftw.usatoday.com/2017/04/jazz-mascot-bear-adult-bubble-race

Saturday Night as an Adult

We really want them to like us. We want it to go well. We overdress. They are narrow people, art people, offhand, linens. It is early summer, first hot weekend. We meet on the street, jumble about with kisses and are we late? They had been late, we’d half-decided to leave, now oh well. That place across the street, ever tried it? Think we went there once, looks closed, says open, well. People coming out. O.K. Inside is dark, cool, oaken. Turns out they know the owner. He beams, ushers, we sit. And realize at once two things, first, the noise is unbearable, two, neither of us knows the other well enough to say bag it. Our hearts crumble. We order food by pointing and break into two yell factions, one each side of the table. He and she both look exhausted, from (I suppose) doing art all day and then the new baby. We eat intently, as if eating were conversation. We keep passing the bread. My fish comes unboned, I weep pretending allergies. Finally someone pays the bill and we escape to the street. For some reason I was expecting snow outside. There is none. We decide not to go for ice cream and part, a little more broken. Saturday night as an adult, so this is it. We thought we’d be Nick and Nora, not their blurred friends in greatcoats. We cover our ears inside our souls. But you can’t stop it that way.

Article source: http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/05/01/saturday-night-as-an-adult